SELF-GUIDED WALKING TOUR

We hope this tour provides you with a taste of all we have to offer. For the highest quality campus experience, we recommend the official walking tour led by members of the Aggie Experience Council. If you have the opportunity, take their 60-minute tour of our campus; it’s the best way to experience Aggieland! To schedule a tour, or if you have any questions about Texas A&M, please contact the Appelt Aggieland Visitor Center at visit@tamu.edu or 979.845.5851, or go to visit.tamu.edu.

 

WALKING TOUR

RUDDER TOWER

1. RUDDER TOWER

1. You are standing in the lobby of Rudder Tower, home to the Appelt Aggieland Visitor Center. The lobby elevators take you up Rudder Tower to the 11th floor where the University Club is located. At the end of the lobby is the Rudder Theatre Complex, which hosts special events, lectures, and arts and entertainment.

Exit through the doors next to the Visitor Center facing the fountain area, and make an immediate left. Walk to the Loyalty Entrance on the southeast corner of the Memorial Student Center.



THE MEMORIAL STUDENT CENTER

2. THE MEMORIAL STUDENT CENTER


2. Both a living memorial and the hub of student life at Texas A&M, the MSC contains iconic Aggie traditions, such as the Flag Room and the Hall of Honor. Either now or after your tour, you may want to spend more time shopping in the MSC Bookstore or dining in one of the many eateries.
Turn right, and walk across Rudder Plaza and the fountain area. Stop when you reach the statue of James Earl Rudder at the beginning of Military Walk.


GENERAL JAMES EARL RUDDER ‘32

3. GENERAL JAMES EARL RUDDER ‘32


3. Texas A&M’s President from 1959-1970 and one of WWII’s most decorated soldiers. He is known for transforming Texas A&M by making the military requirement optional and opening admission to African-Americans and women.


MILITARY WALK

4. MILITARY WALK


4. Historic Military Walk commemorates the path the Corps of Cadets took each morning in formation to Sbisa Dining Hall. Recently renovated and restored to its former glory thanks to the generous donation of a former student, this is now a major thoroughfare through campus.

Continue walking north along Military Walk towards Sbisa Dining Hall. You’ll pass Academic Plaza on your right and the historic YMCA Building on your left.



SBISA DINING HALL

5. SBISA DINING HALL


5. Sbisa is the main dining hall for students and one of the largest university dining halls in the nation. It features an all-you-can-eat buffet of home-style fare, with plenty of healthy options. The Underground Food Court, connected to Sbisa, offers an array of well-known restaurants.

Return south on Military Walk and walk into Academic Plaza.



ACADEMIC PLAZA

6. ACADEMIC PLAZA


6. The centerpiece for main campus and a gathering spot for students studying and relaxing, Academic Plaza is a key landmark of Aggie life. The Plaza continues to serve as a venue for a number of special events and traditions. Three such traditions are commemorated by the Sul Ross Statue and the Silver Taps and Muster markers.

To your left as you face the Academic Building, you will see the Century Tree, one of the first trees planted on Texas A&M’s 5,200-acre campus.

ACADEMIC BUILDING

7. ACADEMIC BUILDING

7. Built in 1912 after the Old Main building burned down, its copper dome has never been polished. The giant mosaic-tile rendition of the university seal, presented to Texas A&M by the Class of 1978,  dominates the floor of the rotunda. Suspended from the rotunda dome is a replica of the Liberty Bell to honor Aggies who made sacrifices during World War II.

Walk past the mosaic floor, down the stairs and out the back door; directly ahead of you is the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives.



CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY & ARCHIVES

8. CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY & ARCHIVES

8. Constructed in 1930 as the first freestanding library on campus, Cushing is home to special collections, rare books and the archives of Texas A&M University. It memorializes the contributions of one of Texas A&M’s most loyal and generous supporters, Col. Edward Benjamin Cushing.

Walk around the left of Cushing and along the north side of the Sterling C. Evans Library. Turn right and enter the Library.



STERLING C. EVANS LIBRARY & LIBRARY ANNEX

9. STERLING C. EVANS LIBRARY & LIBRARY ANNEX

9. With approximately 5 million volumes and 1.5 million  e-books, the Texas A&M Libraries rank eighth among academic research libraries among U.S. public institutions. Evans is the largest and most central library available to students on campus; it also houses the nationally acclaimed University Writing Center.

Continue walking southwest on Nagle Street toward Lubbock and stop in front of the arches.



The Quad

10. THE QUAD

10. The arches serve as the entry point to the Corps of Cadets Quadrangle or “Quad.” The Quad is the home of the Corps, and contains multiple Leadership Learning Centers. Note the Aggie Ring sculpture.

When you leave the Quad, continue on the sidewalk west towards Joe Routt Blvd. Walk on the left sidewalk of Joe Routt Blvd., and stop in front of the Centennial Eagle and the Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center.



SAM HOUSTON SANDERS CORPS OF CADETS CENTER

11. SAM HOUSTON SANDERS CORPS OF CADETS CENTER

11. Home to a museum that houses thousands of Aggie artifacts and a library with more than 3,000 military research volumes. More than 60 exhibits, 600 photographs and thousands of pieces of memorabilia are also on display. The most famous exhibit is the Metzger-Sanders gun collection, which is known nationally and used continually for historical research.

As you continue walking down Joe Routt Blvd., you will not be able to miss the iconic Kyle Field, up ahead.



KYLE FIELD

12. KYLE FIELD

12. Home to the Texas A&M football team in rudimentary form since 1904, Kyle Field is known as The Home of the 12th Man. It is already regarded as one of the most intimidating college football stadiums in the nation. Kyle Field’s recent $485 million renovation increased its capacity to 102,733.

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